Our Fave Teen Cosplayer On Learning To Say 'Fuck It'

 
 
All photos courtesy @themarcollective.

All photos courtesy @themarcollective.

 
 

We sat down with @themarcollective to chat about drag race, cats and toxic masculinity.

 
 
 
 
 

How did you discover cosplay and drag?
I discovered cosplay at the age of 12, but didn’t actively start cosplaying until I was about 15. I didn’t start doing drag until I was 16. When season 7 of Rupaul’s Drag Race aired, everything changed.

That's when I fell in love with Max Malanaphy and started cosplaying his looks from the show. Slowly but surely I started actively practicing makeup and cosplaying more drag queens. Next season I fell in love with Thorgy Thor and Kim Chi; cosplaying Kim Chi really changed my life. She’s been a super supportive and kind person to me.

For me, drag is a creative form of self-expression. It has helped me reclaim my femininity, which is especially important for me as it’s something I used to feel like I should repress, because I’m trans.

 
 
Mar cites the trends Fairy-kei and Lolita as well as Instagrammers like Minori and Prince as inspirations.

Mar cites the trends Fairy-kei and Lolita as well as Instagrammers like Minori and Prince as inspirations.

Self-love and self-acceptance is not an overnight thing.
 
 

How do you define femininity? How do you express it?
For me, my femininity is something I embrace now. As a trans male, the pressure to be hyper masculine is magnified tenfold. And if you’re anything less, you’re “less trans” than the next guy. This way of thinking is extremely toxic and will only leave you miserable.

Can you tell me a little bit about what gave you the confidence you mention here? How did you learn and internalize that wisdom about body image and self-acceptance?
Like I said in the post, I thought I wouldn’t be able to wear a certain type of clothing or present myself in a certain way because of my size. In most fashion, especially in J-fashion, the most celebrated people are the ones who are skinny with delicate features—small nose, lips, etc. But me, I’m chubby, have a wide nose and big lips. I thought I couldn’t ever pull it off. But I finally learned to just say fuck it, you know? If it’s something you’re truly passionate about then heck yes, you can do it!

Now, looking back at myself I feel almost sad at all of the missed opportunities I had due to my lack of confidence. But self-love and self-acceptance is not an overnight thing. I’ve been working on it for years and I’m not yet where I want to be, but I’ve come a long way, so I’m proud of that.

 
 
"Grey. Without a doubt grey," says Mar when asked about his favorite hair color. "My boy hair is grey and 99% of my drag is with grey hair. I can’t live without it."

"Grey. Without a doubt grey," says Mar when asked about his favorite hair color. "My boy hair is grey and 99% of my drag is with grey hair. I can’t live without it."

 
 

How different is your drag performance from when you cosplay?
Cosplay is a way to express how much I adore a character or person by dressing up as them. Drag is different. Drag is a persona that I’ve made up, and Mar the queen has their own aesthetic. For me, drag is an exaggerated, louder version of myself; cosplay is being someone else.

What is your favorite color combo?
Pink and silver. I will support this until the day that I die. Or, just pastels in general.

Dogs or cats?
Both. I show dogs [professionally], but worship cats.

Lashes or lips?
Lashes 100%.

 
 
If you created your own hashtag that went viral, what would it be? "Oooh, well probably something like #FemTransAndProud! Just something to celebrate and embrace feminine trans boys."

If you created your own hashtag that went viral, what would it be? "Oooh, well probably something like #FemTransAndProud! Just something to celebrate and embrace feminine trans boys."